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ICE Americas

ICE Americas supports members living and working in Canada, USA, West Indies and other regions in the area.

It shares knowledge, influences public infrastructure policy, and encourages innovation and excellence in the civil engineering profession.

ICE Americas also aims to raise the profile of civil engineering by working with the media, schools and universities.

Find out more about ICE's work in Americas, including local events, competitions and awards, the latest civil engineering news, and how you can get more involved.

Events happening across the Americas

ICE regions in Americas

We represent the interests of our international members through a dedicated platform for the following regions in the Americas.

Click on an individual region to find out more.

ICE Canada

There are around 530 ICE members living in Canada, working on a huge range of projects across the country. We have volunteers representing four regions in Canada - East, West, Central and Prairies.

Our representatives in Canada support and advise ICE members, and provide guidance to aspiring members in those areas. To find out how you can get in touch with any ICE representatives, please visit the Canada contact page.

To find out about events in the Canada Prairies region, please visit the joint association web page.

To find out about events in the Western Canada region, please visit the joint association web page.

Working in Canada

If you're thinking about working in Canada, or need more information about the requirements for working there, we've put together a brief guide to help you.

Explore the sections below to learn more about opportunities available to you in Canada.

In Canada, only a Professional Engineer (PEng) is licensed to practise engineering and to take responsibility for their work and that of others. This includes signing and sealing design documents. Unlicensed engineers have to be supervised by a Professional Engineer.

PEng status is similar to Chartered Engineer (CEng) status in the UK and is awarded by the relevant provincial or territorial professional engineering association (see below).

Before becoming a PEng, you may need one full year of experience in Canada, supervised by a licensed engineer. While you're working towards becoming a PEng, you may be able to register as a 'member-in-training', a 'temporary PEng', or 'non-resident licensee PEng'.

Generally, to become a PEng you must be a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident. If you intend to work in Quebec, you should be able to write and speak in near fluent technical French.

Before you can work in Canada you must be a Canadian citizen, permanent resident or hold a temporary work visa. Find out how you can get a visa:

Please visit the Engineers Canada website for more detailed information about moving to Canada, the engineering profession and registration requirements:

The national engineering organisation is Engineers Canada, buteach province or territory has its own professional engineering association, which is the regulatory body that awards the PEng license.

The Canadian Society for Civil Engineering is a learned society created to develop and maintain high standards of civil engineering practice in Canada and to enhance the public image of the civil engineering profession. Membership is obtained separately from the PEng license.

Unfortunately, Engineers Canada and the Engineering Council don't recognise each other's professional qualifications for registration purposes. This means that even if you are CEng MICE, you'll also have to qualify directly in Canada to get the PEng license.

However, both bodies have signed the Washington Accord which concerns the recognition of engineering degrees, so if you hold a degree accredited by the Engineering Council for CEng registration, you should expect to be exempt from the academic assessment for PEng registration, but you will need to complete all other criteria, including the Professional Practise examination.

If you encounter any difficulties with the registration process or are required to undertake an academic assessment, please contact us at [email protected]

Please visit the ICE Canada contact webpage for contact details of our representatives. They are volunteer qualified members and are not immigration or employment agents.

Committees

ICE has three Committees across Canada - the Canadian Prairies Group of Chartered Engineers, Chartered Engineers of Pacific Western Canada and Canada Ontario Local Committee.

Find out what they do and how you can get involved.

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Committee members
Name Position
Sally Austin Test

The Canadian Prairies Group of Chartered Engineers (CPGCE) is a multi-disciplinary group of members of British Engineering Institutions who live and/or work in Alberta, Saskatchewan or the Northwest Territories. CPGCE has been actively arranging technical events for many years bringing together industry experts to get an update on projects, challenges, and opportunities. These events provide an excellent networking opportunity for professionals in a relaxed setting.

Got a question?

If you've got a question for the committee, please feel free to contact us:

e: [email protected]
Committee members
Name Position
Steve Nevin Chairman
Malcolm Gray Vice-Chairman
Nigel Shrive Past Chairman
Titilayo Fatigun Treasurer / Webmaster
Rick Marshall Secretary
Emily Hicks Deputy Treasurer / Awards
Ron Wong Awards / IStructE: UK Institution Liaison Members
Derrick Stableford Awards / Technical
Mia Jovic Newsletter
David Bartle ICE Rep / Membership / ICE: UK Institution Liaison Members
Seyi Smith Communication, Marketing & Outreach
Bob Salt Technical / IMechE: UK Institution Liaison Members
Richard Coldbeck Technical / IET: UK Institution Liaison Members

Chartered Engineers Pacific (CEP), formerly Western Canada Group of Chartered Engineers, serves members of ICE, IMechE, IET, IStructE, CIBSE located in British Columbia, Yukon, Washington State and Alaska. The Group exists to extend the Institutions' services to members locally, and to assist local professional engineers, EITs and technologists with aspirations to register professionally in Europe.

Got a question?

If you've got a question for the committee, please feel free to contact us:

e: [email protected]

Committee members
Name Position
Suresh Vishwakarma Chair / IET Representative / CCA Member
George De Ridder Interim Hon. Secretary
Matthew Walton-Knight Past Chair
Douglas Yee Hon. Treasurer
Mandeep Arora ICE Rep
Alan Wood Committee member
Alan Kay Committee member
Zeeshan khan Committee member
Vanessa Nodar Juste Committee member
Arul Raja Committee member
Chris Richards Committee member
David Woo Committee member
David Harvey Ex Officio / IStructE Representative

ICE volunteer representatives

We have volunteer members in Canada who helps arrange ICE activities and promote our work.

David Bartle

Regional Volunteer

David is the representative for the Canadian Prairies, including Alberta, Northwest Territories and Saskatchewan

David Bartle

Stephen Coyne CEng MICE

Regional Volunteer

Stephen is the representative for the Canadian Prairies, including Alberta, Northwest Territories and Saskatchewan

Stephen Coyne CEng MICE

Philippa Higgins

Regional Volunteer

Philippa is the representative for Central & Eastern Canada, including Manitoba and Ontario

Philippa Higgins

Barry Hurndall

Regional Volunteer

Barry is the representative for Atlantic Canada, including Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, Quebec

Barry Hurndall

Mandeep Arora

Regional Volunteer

Mandeep is the representative for Western Canada, including British Columbia, Nunavut and Yukon Territory

Mandeep Arora

If you have a query and your region is not represented above, please contact us at [email protected].

ICE USA

There are around 600 ICE members living and working across the USA. Our members work on a huge range of projects across the country.

ICE has representatives in six regions of the USA. We have local associations in the north-eastern states and western states, and representatives only in the mid-Atlantic states, mid-western states, southern states and south-eastern states.

The Engineering Council and Idaho Licensing Board have signed a Comity Agreement which offers a streamlined route to registration for CEng registrants and Idaho-registered Professional Engineers. For more information go to the Engineering Council website or email [email protected]

Working in the USA

If you're thinking about working in the USA, or need more information about the requirements for working there, we've put together a brief guide to help you.

Explore the sections below to learn more about opportunities available to you in the USA.

If you're considering working in the USA, you should be aware that the right to work and getting a visa can be much more restrictive than you may expect. To become a permanent resident you will require a Green Card. The most common ways to get one are through family or marriage, intra-company transfer visas and employer sponsorship.

Find out more about working in the US and Green Cards.

If you are intending to carry out engineering work in the USA, you are strongly advised to check whether you require licensure in order to carry out the activity legally. You should check with the State Licencing Board in every state where you intend to practice. In the United States, licensure (registration) for the engineering and surveying professions is regulated by each individual state. Only licensed engineers can call themselves 'professional engineers' (PEs) and perform certain tasks.

While there are some similarities, such as requirements for education and work experience, the process for getting licensure in the USA is very different to the professional qualification process in the UK.

To get civil engineering licensure you must:

  1. Hold a four-year ABET-accredited degree (or degree(s) assessed as equivalent)
  2. Pass the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam. This is a six-hour multiple choice exam for recent graduates and students who are close to finishing an undergraduate engineering degree. The FE exam is now computer-based which is administered all-year-round at approved centres.
  3. Have acceptable work experience (usually at least four years)
  4. Pass the Professional Engineer exam in the relevant discipline (an eight-hour exam held twice a year in April and October)

Get an overview of licensure requirements.

Each State has its own statutory requirements for regulating engineering practice that are the responsibility of State Licensing Boards. The requirements may restrict or prohibit the use of professional engineering titles awarded outside the state in question.

The titles 'engineer', 'civil engineer' and others are protected in most states. However, the titles Chartered Engineer (CEng) and ICE Member (MICE) are not legally recognised and cannot be used as an alternative to Professional Engineer (PE).

In particular please refer to the Engineering Council’s advice on using the title "Engineer" in Texas. It is possible to work in the field of civil engineering in the USA without licensure, depending on the type and level of work you're doing and if you're under the 'responsible charge' of a licensed PE. But if you don't get PE licensure, your range of work and employment opportunities will certainly be limited.

The Engineering Council is working with The National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) to improve the recognition of CEng across the USA, but other than the Comity Agreement with the Idaho Licensing Board (please see section below), there is currently no formal recognition or exemption for CEng in the USA. MICE therefore have to apply to each individual state licensing board in the same way as a non-licensed engineer.

In most states, to take the PE and FE exams you'll normally need at least a four-year, full-time engineering degree, or equivalent. Some states will allow an exemption from the FE exam if you have significant experience (often more than 15 years).

Find out more about the exams

Getting non-US qualifications recognised by individual state licensing boards can be very difficult, particularly for older degrees. This is because you have to prove the units that were studied, as well as other information.

The USA's degree accreditation body, ABET, is a signatory to the Washington Accord (an agreement between engineering organisation in various countries to recognise each other's accredited academic qualifications). however, it is the individual state licensing boards, not ABET, which decide the academic requirements for PE licensure in their state.

To help with this process, The National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES)provides a 'credentials evaluation' service for engineers with non-US/non-ABET-accredited qualifications which you may find useful.

After you've become licensed as a PE in one state, most others will grant their own PE licensure under a process known as comity or reciprocity. However, you may need to take additional exams on topics such as seismic design, surveying, business ethics and state law.

The most efficient way to become licensed in another state, may be to apply for an 'NCEES Record', although this may still take several months. Find out more about this service.

The Engineering Council is working with NCEES to get better recognition for Chartered Engineers, so please let us know through [email protected] if you encounter any difficulties with the recognition of your academic qualifications or CEng status when applying for PE licensure.

The Engineering Council and Idaho Licensing Board have signed a Comity Agreement which offers a streamlined route to registration for CEng registrants and Idaho-registered Professional Engineers.

To find out more about the criteria and making an application please visit the Engineering Council webpage: Working and Licensure in the USA. You can also contact [email protected] if you have any questions about the process.

ICE in the USA

ICE has representatives in six regions of the USA. Find out how you can get in touch with your representative.

Our representatives are volunteer qualified members and are not immigration or employment agents; however they are able to offer more focused advice on practising civil engineering within their region. They would be happy to advise you.

The National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES)

NCEES administers the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) and Professional Engineer (PE) exams. It's a national not-for-profit organisation which promotes professional licensure for engineers and surveyors. The council's members are the engineering and surveying licensing boards from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands. Find out more about NCEES.

State licensing boards

Each state has its own licensing board, which processes applications and awards the PE license. You can find details of each state licensing board, including details of the licensure requirements that are specific to that state, on the NCEES website.

American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)

ASCE is the national civil engineering society for knowledge transfer and events.

Membership of ASCE is not equivalent to ICE membership (MICE) as it is not a professional qualification, although there are specific criteria for membership. Chartered members of ICE (CEng MICE) should expect to be eligible for member or associate member grade, depending on the academic qualifications they hold, their experience, and place of residence at the time of applying. For example, to become a member, you must be a resident of the USA.

This is an account of someone's experience in getting a PE license in one particular state in 2013. While it shouldn't use it as a blueprint for your own application, it will give you an idea of what to expect.

Get foreign degree evaluation from NCEES

Transcripts of courses taken, marks awarded and syllabus materials had to be submitted to NCEES (directly by my university). This is a time consuming and arduous step as the UK university system does not align with the US system of credits scores.

When evaluating the equivalency of a UK degree, NCEES are looking for specific data which must be checked off. To help overcome this, the relatively new European system of assigning credit hours to courses was helpful, but may require you to work with the university records/alumni office/faculty.

Apply for the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam (known in some states as the Engineer-in-Training (EIT) exam

This involved submitting a summary of work experience, with no 'gaps'. This must also be verified by, typically, five engineers who know the candidate, have worked with them and can testify to their experience. Typically, at least three of these engineers must be PEs licensed to practice in the US. So, expect to work a couple of years or more in the US, to build experience that can be verified in the US. My UK experience was verified by a chartered engineer and ICE fellow (CEng FICE), but I still needed three licensed PEs in addition to that.

Residency status/authorisation to work in the US (I.e. a government-issued immigration authorisation)

In my case I had to provide a copy of my Green Card, but residency is not a requirement for registration in every state.

The Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam

This was a demanding exam, lasting eight hours. Please note: the exam requirements and process have now changed. Please visit the NCEES website for current details.

The morning session was four hours and comprised 120 multiple-choice (A, B, C or D) questions on a broad range of engineering and science subjects. These included mathematics, mechanics, statics, dynamics, fluid statics and dynamics, thermodynamics, hydraulics open channel flow, pipe flow, pumps, materials, engineering economics, chemistry, biology, heat transfer, kinematics, kinetics, electrostatics and electromagnetics, AC and DC circuits, three-phase electricity, rotating electrical machines, electronics, computer systems, engineering law and ethics.

The afternoon session was four hours long and comprised 60 multiple-choice questions. When you apply, you choose a discipline to be examined on in the afternoon session. I chose the general or 'other disciplines' option which is essentially more of the same topics that were examined in the morning. The other choices were chemical, civil, electrical, environmental, industrial, or mechanical.

I chose 'other disciplines' as it effectively reduced the breadth of topics I studied to prepare. Being able to manage your time pressure under exam conditions (one question every two minutes in the morning, and one every four minutes in the afternoon) and preparing adequately are the keys to success.

Preparing for the FE exam

My advice is to allow at least six months of preparation time, and preferably a year if you're several years out of university. Reference materials are available, including sample practice exam questions – for example, Professional Publications, Inc., which is a well known series by Lindeburg. The most reliable path to success is doing many practice problems under timed conditions.

I tracked my preparation hours, which helped me keep focus. I logged about 450 hours over a 12-month period. In the three months prior to the exam, I studied at least two to three hours per night, five to six nights a week. It's a demanding time, that needs careful planning and dedication around work and personal/family commitments.

Applying for the PE exam

After passing the FE exam, apply for the Professional Engineer exam, providing you've got enough experience. The state boards vary in this respect but, typically, four years is needed. Application forms are completed and submitted to the state board – this process may take three months or more. Find out more about the current requirements

Additional experience verification is required, and typically five engineers need to submit reference forms to verify the experience. At least three must be PEs in the USA.

Once granted permission to sit the PE exam, the candidate then applies to NCEES for a sitting. The PE exam is offered twice per year, in April and October.

The PE exam

The PE exam is also an eight-hour exam. The four-hour morning session is the 'breadth' exam and is the same for all engineering disciplines. The 'civil' breadth exam covers topics in construction, geotechnics, structures, transportation, water resources and environmental engineering.

The four-hour afternoon 'depth' session covers topics in the candidates selected specialism. In my case, that was geotechnical engineering. My advice is to take the PE as soon as you can after the FE, as the preparation work will still be fresh. Again, there are reference materials available and practice sample questions.

There are 40 questions in the morning and 40 questions in the afternoon. Maintaining exam focus for eight hours, and managing time (one question every six minutes) is the key to success. I, like most engineers I know, found the PE exam reasonably straightforward and more in keeping with my everyday work. Consequently, preparation time was less than the FE – about three months, working two hours per night, five nights per week.

Costs

Costs of this process will vary but you should budget for around $2,000.

This covers costs associated with foreign degree evaluation, FE application to the state board, PE application to the state board, NCEES FE exam fee, NCEES PE exam fee, overseas postage, passport photographs, hotel and travel costs associated with attending the FE and PE exams (usually travel required the day before, to a restricted number of locations within any particular state), costs of FE and PE review manuals, FE and PE sample questions, FE and PE sample exam publications, PE stamp, PE license certificate.

Costs will increase if FE and PE review courses are attended externally, either classroom based or online

< and PE exams (usually travel required the day before, to a restricted number of locations within any particular state), costs of FE and PE review manuals, FE and PE sample questions, FE and PE sample exam publications, PE stamp, PE license certificate.

Costs will increase if FE and PE review courses are attended externally, either classroom based or online.

ICE volunteer representatives

We have volunteer members across the USA who help arrange ICE activities and promote our work.

If you've got any questions or want to get involved in our work then please contact the person closest to you.

Andrew Ardrey CEng MICE

Regional Volunteer

Andrew is the representative for New York

Andrew Ardrey CEng MICE

Kristian Heighway CEng MICE

Regional Volunteer

Kristian is the representative for Texas

Kristian Heighway CEng MICE

Paul Richardson MICE

Regional Volunteer

Paul is the representative for Massachusetts

Paul Richardson MICE

Julian Lineham

Regional Volunteer

Julian Lineham PE SECB F.SEI F.ASCE CEng FICE, a founding Principal of Studio NYL, spent the first ten years of his career in London, England.  While in London, Julian led structural engineering teams on many notable UK projects including Microsoft UK’s prestigious headquarters campus and the New British Embassy in Oman.  He worked on several international design competition entries.

In 1997 Julian moved to Boulder, Colorado and led a structural engineering group for a local firm.  In 2004 Julian co-founded Studio NYL Structural Engineers with Christopher O’Hara.  His work includes projects in the USA, UK, Mexico, The Caribbean, Dubai, Oman, Peru and varies in scale from sculpture and art pieces, custom residential homes, schools, higher education buildings, institutional buildings, theatres, offices and stadia. 

Julian is the Americas Representative on the Institutional of Civil Engineers Council (London, UK), and is also the Colorado USA Representative for the Institution. He has served on the Structural Engineering Institute (SEI) of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Global Activities Division since 2018 and will be Chair for 2022-2023

Julian is a licensed Professional Engineer (PE) in 37 states and the District of Columbia, and also holds a Chartered Engineering (CEng) license in England.  He became a Fellow of ICE in 2017 and a Fellow of SEI and ASCE in 2018. 

Julian Lineham

Peter Copplestone CEng FICE

Regional Volunteer

Peter is the representative for Washington

Peter Copplestone CEng FICE

If you have a query and your region is not represented above, please contact us at [email protected].

ICE West Indies

There are around 200 ICE members living and working across the West Indies. Our members work on a huge range of projects across the islands.

At the heart of our work is the ICE West Indies Local Association based in Trinidad and Tobago (ICEWILA), which is led by volunteers.

ICEWILA promotes ICE activities in the West Indies by building a strong network to help share ideas and knowledge among civil engineers, graduates, technicians, associates and students of the region. The association encourages and supports members to become professionally qualified so they can contribute more to ICE and civil engineering, not only to the region but around the world. Keep up to with its activity on their Facebook page.

If you would like to read about ICE activity in the region, then take a look at their most recent newsletter.

Committees

ICE has one Local Association based in Trinidad and Tobago.

Find out what they do and how you can get involved.

The West Indies Local Association (ICEWILA) promotes ICE activities in the West Indies by building a strong network to help share ideas and knowledge among civil engineers, graduates, technicians, associates and students of the region. The association encourages and supports members to become professionally qualified so they can contribute more to ICE and civil engineering, not only to the region but around the world.

The ICEWILA arranges events, visits to ongoing engineering projects and social activities for ICE members based in the region. This gives members the opportunity to share knowledge and network with other professional engineers.

The association is made up of the ICE representative for West indies and ICE members from the region.

Contact: - [email protected]

Committee members
Name Position
Leighton Ellis Regional Volunteer
Sasier Gokool Treasurer

ICE volunteer representative

We have a volunteer representative in the West Indies

Leighton Ellis

Regional Volunteer

Volunteer representative for West Indies

Leighton Ellis

If you have a query and your region is not represented above, please contact us at [email protected].

Other regions

There are ICE members living in Bahamas and working on a range of projects across the country.

Your country rep is Ms Michelle Lakin Hope CEng MICE and you can contact them at: [email protected].

There are ICE members living in Barbados and working on a range of projects across the country.

Your country rep is Ms Loretta Walker CEng MICE and you can contact them at: [email protected].

There are ICE members living in Bermuda and working on a range of projects across the country.

Your country rep is Ricardo Graham-Ward and you can contact them at: [email protected].

There are ICE members living in Brazil and working on a range of projects across the country.

Your country rep is Richard Taylor and you can contact them at: [email protected].

There are ICE members living in Cayman Islands, and working on a range of projects across the country.

Your country rep is Mr Garth Arch CEng MICE and you can contact them at: [email protected].

If you have a query and your region is not represented above, please contact us at [email protected].

Discover professional development training near you

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