Emergency works, Ten Mile Bank, River Great Ouse

In February 2015, an inspection along the River Great Ouse at Ten Mile Bank found that an area of floodbank was showing signs of movement. A breach of the floodbank would immediately affect two nearby farms and surrounding fields and could lead to more widespread flooding.

Left to right Andrew Rouse(Environment Agency), Paul Mitchelmore (ICE East of England Regional Executive Board Chair), Kevin Marsh (CH2M) and Ian Lock (JacksonHyder).
Left to right Andrew Rouse(Environment Agency), Paul Mitchelmore (ICE East of England Regional Executive Board Chair), Kevin Marsh (CH2M) and Ian Lock (JacksonHyder).
  • Updated: 06 June, 2016

This is not a big or highly technical scheme, however, it still shows how civil engineering benefits our communities.

In February 2015, an inspection along the River Great Ouse at Ten Mile Bank found that an area of floodbank was showing signs of movement. This could cause a failure of both the bank and nearby road.

A breach of the bank would immediately affect two nearby farms and surrounding fields. If the flow of water continued this would lead to more widespread flooding. The floodbank helps to provide flood protection to 402 homes and businesses as well as a large are of agricultural land.

The bank was still moving in March 2015 and Norfolk County Council decided to put in place an emergency road closure for the safety of the public. Following this, the Environment Agency also declared an emergency.

In May CH2M (Halcrow), Arcadis and JacksonHyder began to work with the Environment Agency to find a solution. The repair needed to be designed and built before the autumn flood season. Through close working the Project team, Norfolk County Council and the landowner, the bank was re-built and the road re-opened ahead of time and under-budget. This successful repair ensured that no people, property or wildlife were at risk over the winter 2015/2016.

Damaged floodbank
Damaged floodbank
Cutting piles to the right height to help with stability of the floodbank
Cutting piles to the right height to help with stability of the floodbank
Final solution of the floodbank and road repairs
Final solution of the floodbank and road repairs

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