#thisiscivilengineering at the Queensferry Crossing

ICE Director General visits magnificent example of civil engineering at the Queensferry Crossing

L to R: Former ICE Glasgow & West of Scotland branch chair Laurence Shackman, ICE Director General Nick Baveystock, Alan Hutchison, Chair, Dundee Area Branch; and Alastair Templeton, Chair, Edinburgh Area Branch.
L to R: Former ICE Glasgow & West of Scotland branch chair Laurence Shackman, ICE Director General Nick Baveystock, Alan Hutchison, Chair, Dundee Area Branch; and Alastair Templeton, Chair, Edinburgh Area Branch.
  • Updated: 04 July, 2016
The various elements of the bridge deck have steadily grown towards each other as the project has progressed. (picture courtesy of Transport Scotland)
The various elements of the bridge deck have steadily grown towards each other as the project has progressed. (picture courtesy of Transport Scotland)

ICE Director General Nick Baveystock recently visited the on-going Forth Replacement Crossing project which has the magnificent Queensferry Crossing at its heart.

The Director General (pictured second from the left) was accompanied by (l to r) former ICE Glasgow & West of Scotland branch chair Laurence Shackman, who is Project Manager, Transport Scotland, Queensferry Crossing; Alan Hutchison, Chair, Dundee Area Branch; and Alastair Templeton, Chair, Edinburgh Area Branch.

While there they were able to see the #thisiscivilengineering banners displayed around the works as the bridge grows to become a stunning piece of infrastructure beside the existing Forth Road Bridge and the iconic Forth Bridge.

The Queensferry Crossing is due to open in May 2017 and is a fine example of modern civil engineering. It forms the centerpiece of a major upgrade to the cross-Forth transport corridor in the east of Scotland, representing a total Scottish Government investment of £1.325 to £1.35 billion, releasing £245 million worth of savings since construction started in June 2011.

The 1.7 miles (2.7km) structure will be the longest three-tower, cable-stayed bridge in the world and also by far the largest to feature cables which cross mid-span. This innovative design provides extra strength and stiffness, allowing the towers and the deck to be more slender and elegant.

In total, the overall Forth Replacement Crossing scheme is 13.7 miles (22km) long, including major motorway upgrades to the north and south of the bridge and also the first ever use in Scotland of variable mandatory speed limits to smooth traffic congestion via an Intelligent Transport System. This also controls dedicated bus lanes within the motorway hard shoulders – another first in Scotland.

When the new crossing opens in May 2017, the Forth Road Bridge will become dedicated for public transport use, cycling and walking.

From the air one gets a real appreciation of scale of the bridge and the surrounding infrastructure development. (picture courtesy of Transport Scotland)
From the air one gets a real appreciation of scale of the bridge and the surrounding infrastructure development. (picture courtesy of Transport Scotland)
#thisiscivilengineering banners feature around the various elements of the crossing project.
#thisiscivilengineering banners feature around the various elements of the crossing project.
 

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