Construction logistics and cycle safety

Between 2008 and 2013, 55 per cent of cyclist fatalities in London involved a heavy goods vehicle. A disproportionate number of these were construction vehicles. ICE is committed to reducing the danger posed to cyclists and pedestrians in urban areas and is working with industry to identify solutions.

Left-turning construction vehicle in Westminster which demonstrates the limited space available for large vehicles navigating London's streets and the potential danger to cyclists caught inside if this turning-circle.
Left-turning construction vehicle in Westminster which demonstrates the limited space available for large vehicles navigating London's streets and the potential danger to cyclists caught inside if this turning-circle.

ICE is committed to reducing the danger posed to cyclists and pedestrians in urban areas and is working with industry to present and implement solutions to minimise the hazard posed by HGV and Construction Vehicles when sharing the roads with others. As part of this commitment ICE is working with industry to:

No room next to the lorry for cyclists
No room next to the lorry for cyclists
  • Identify potential improvements in construction logistics' off-site health & safety practices and legislation for the protection of cyclists;
  • Promote, encourage and potentially enforce best available technology to eliminate 'blind spots' and improve safety of construction and heavy goods vehicles;
  • Promote mandatory certified specialist training for drivers of heavy goods vehicles covering the vulnerability of cyclists and the specific risks posed by HGVs.

Why should ICE be concerned about cycle safety?

Between 2008 and 2013, 55 per cent of cyclist fatalities in London involved a heavy goods vehicle. A disproportionate number of these were construction vehicles. In 2012 Transport for London (TfL) commissioned an independent review of the construction sector's transport activities to understand the causes of these collisions and how they might be prevented. The research found that:

  • Blind spots on construction vehicles could be larger than general haulage vehicles;
  • Road safety was not treated in the same way as on-site health and safety.
  • There was little understanding of the impact of construction activity on road safety; and
  • There was no common standard for the industry to work to in order to manage work related road safety.

What has happened since this research?

Following publication of the report, the construction logistics industry has demonstrated its commitment to change and formed the Construction Industry and Cycle Safety (CLOCS) initiative, which has brought the construction logistics industry together to revolutionise the management of work related road risk (WRRR) and ultimately help to protect all road users who share the roads with construction vehicles.

The result of this initiatiive was the production of a Standard for Construction Logistics: managing work related road risk.

ICE continues to work with CLOCS to progress the identified actions under three work streams to improve road safety:

What does ICE recommend?

ICE is a CLOCS Champion, and recommends that industry implements the requirements outlined in the CLOCS Standard for Construction Logistics: managing work related road risk.

ICE also recommends and has provided, as a free download, a chapter of its Manual for Health & Safety in Construction (2010). This chapter 'Traffic & Vehicle movement' explains how construction vehicle and traffic movement can be planned and undertaken to minimise the risk of causing harm to anyone. This is essential reading for all ICE members and others who are involved in planning construction logistics or driving vehicles.

ICE has also established a Cycling Working Group (CWG), which has been active in addressing improvements to highway and infrastructure improvements for cyclists, and has also influenced Government and EU Parliament to improve vehicle design; training and legislation.

This will not be the end of the issue however, as ICE recognises that there is a great deal to be done before the UKs towns and cities can be regarded as cycle-friendly.

Cement trucks need more room to turn
Cement trucks need more room to turn
Large vehicles can have big blind spots for cyclists
Large vehicles can have big blind spots for cyclists

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