Benefit from three days of quality programme showcasing the best coastal management practices from around the world

On day one and day two, benefit from quality multi-stream content and learn about the new approaches to coastal engineering.

After two days of intense learning and discussions, on day three, join the technical site visit to La Faute Sur Mer to explore the locations that were hardest hit by Storm Xynthia. 
  • 18:30
    Welcome drinks reception
    Ahead of the conference start, join us for the complimentary welcome drinks reception and network with delegates from around the world. 

    The drinks reception will take place at the conference venue - Mercure La Rochelle Vieux Port Sud. 




     
  • 08:30
    Registration, refreshments and exhibition
     
  • 10:00
    Chair’s opening remarks
     
  • 10:15
    Keynote address
     
  • 11:00
    Q&A session
     
  • 11:15
    Refreshments, networking and exhibition
     

Conference divides into streams

Stream 1
Stream 2
Stream 3
  • 11:45
    Polis Littoral National Programme: 10 years of partnership experience in managing and enhancing coastal areas in Portugal

    In 2008, the Portuguese Government decided to create a National Programme – “Polis Litoral- Integrated Operations of Rehabilitation and Recovery of Coastal Areas” -– aiming at developing a multiplicity of projects to protect and enhance coastal zones, in particularly sensitive areas. 

    After 10 years of its creation, a preliminary assessment of Polis Litoral Programme is presented.  

    This session will cover: 

    • The practical result of this experience, including the strengths and weaknesses 

    • Examples of the more emblematic initiatives undertaken 

    • Lessons learned for a future where climate change challenges us to pursuit the most effective way to manage our most vulnerable territories 

  • 12:05
    Stakeholder expectations of the public in local coastal flood risk management in England

    This session analyses the challenges of stakeholders implementing flood risk management policy locally, and their expectations of the public regarding coastal flood risk. These challenges are examined from engineering, planning and insurance perspectives, through thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews in two case studies in contrasting English regions.   

    This session will cover:  

    • The challenges facing stakeholders implementing FRM policy locally 

    • Stakeholders’ expectations of public awareness and involvement in coastal flood risk management 

    • Disjuncture between the aims of coastal FRM policies and the resources available to actualise these goals 

  • 12:25
    Multi-disciplinary modelling and analysis of drivers of the implementation gap in coastal risk management

    Climate change, coastal hazards and human development have increased risk profiles along urban coastlines worldwide.  Accompanying this intensifying risk is the increased demand for risk management – predominately by defending, adapting or retreating.  Despite the efforts of engineers, managers and policy makers, the implementation gap between projects or strategies receiving resources for conceptualization and projects or strategies that are executed remains significant.   

    This session will cover: 

    • The roles of engineers within decision making frameworks underpinning project implementation; and 

    • Processes propelling projects toward implementation or abandonment during conceptualization, engagement and execution phases 

  • 12:45
    Q&A session
     
  • 11:45
    Environmental inequalities on the coast of North Charente – maritime department in exposure to hazards
    In the last few years since Storm Xynthia, different adaptation strategies were developed and implemented to protect structural issues and coastal population. The choice between one or the other strategy is mainly based on a cost-benefit analysis, with less attention to social criterias.  

    This session will cover:
    • The main policy choices made by French authorities along the Atlantic coast  
    • Nine years later, what are the effects of these policy choices? 
    • A case study in the Baie d’Aiguillon, just north of La Rochelle 
  • 12:05
    Nine years after storm Xynthia, what has changed?

    Storm Xynthia caused a storm surge along the French Atlantic coast. Dikes, dunes and structures were overtopped and breached. 47 people died due to the floods in the departments Vendée and Charente Maritime. Three people lost their lives in Aytre, a part of La Rochelle.  

    In June 2010 flash floods killed 25 people in the Var Region. As a reaction to both floods the French government launched the program “le plan submersions rapides”, which ran from 2011 to  2016. Parallel to the “plan submersions rapides”, regulations for assessment and design of flood defences were provided in the “décret digues”.  Organizational changes were provided through the GEMAPI act. This covers both roles and responsibilities as a new tax to finance maintenance and reconstruction of flood defences. 

    This session will cover: 

    • The main policy choices made by French authorities along the Atlantic coast  

    • Nine years later, what are the effects of these policy choices? 

    • A case study in the Baie d’Aiguillon, just north of La Rochelle 

    • The constraints for long term repairs, including regulations, financing and the on the actual or perceived impact of the measures on surrounding areas 

  • 12:25
    Facilitated discussion
     
  • 12:45
    Q&A session
     
  • 11:45
    Refurbishment and repairs of the world famous Cobb Harbour and breakwater in Lyme Regis: a case study on the multiple benefits a coastal engineering project can bring, and the challenges this presents

    The Cobb Harbour and breakwater is the oldest example of this type of structure in the UK with the original elements dating back to the 12th century.  The structure is Grade 1 listed and displays a number of unique heritage features. 

    Today the Cobb provides coastal erosion protection to 60 homes and businesses within Lyme Regis. A recent structural survey found that it was suffering from serious scour and undermining in many areas as well as structural movement.  It has been estimated that without intervention failure of the cobb is likely to occur in approximately 20-30 years. 

    West Dorset District Council commissioned a project to develop the design for repairs to the Cobb whilst also wishing to deliver commercial and recreational amenity upgrades.  

    This session will cover: 

    • The challenge of balancing the needs for improvement and repair against heritage impact and cost 

    • The improvement options that have been developed which consider the challenges faced by the team to achieve the critical balance between the desire for structural and amenity improvement and heritage acceptability 

  • 12:05
    Port Clarence and Greatham South Flood Alleviation Scheme

    A case study of a flood risk reduction and habitat creation scheme in the Tees estuary, North East England. The scheme was developed as part of the Tees Tidal Flood Risk Management Strategy (TTFRMS) to provide a sustainable, cost effective plan for managing flood risk within the Tees Estuary alongside the national and internationally sensitive habitats within the study area. 

    This session will cover: 

    • The sustainable solutions adopted to reduce flood risk to the community and industry 

    • The economic benefits and construction challenges experienced 

    • The need to protect and improve environmental habitat and provide benefits to the community 

  • 12:25
    Managing ecological, community and bathing water quality aspects in construction: Runswick Bay coastal protection scheme

    The Runswick Bay Coastal Protection Scheme comprised repairs and installation of concrete toe protection to the existing seawall and the placement of approximately 9,500 tonnes of imported rock armour to form a new revetment totaling 250m length. 

    The historic concrete seawall had reached the end of its serviceable life with a predicted failure within the next ten years. The newly constructed scheme offers an enhanced standard of protection to 96 residential and 17 non-residential properties including 6 listed buildings and infrastructure such as access roads and utilities, from coastal erosion for the next 100 years.  

    This session will cover: 

    • Details on how the scheme was achieved through collaboration across a wide project team with a focus on long-term coastal protection 

    • The application of ecological enhancements to increase the diversify of marine species colonising newly traditional rock armour 

    • Managing construction activities to reduce impacts on marine ecology and water quality 

  • 12:45
    Q&A session
     
  • 13:00
    Lunch, networking and exhibition
     

Conference divides into streams

Stream 1
Stream 2
Stream 3
  • 14:00
    Disappearing beaches? Examples of their increasing replacement in Great Britain by hard structures and non-cohesive sediment accumulations

    Despite widespread enthusiasm for beach management in the 1990s and dramatic increases in research and guidance on all aspects of coastal management including beach management since then, observations from around the British coast suggests a steady increase in the length of coast being converted from beach management to hard engineering.

    This presentation will provide examples of the evidence collected, investigate the reasons for the decrease in beach management and introduces the concept of ‘non-cohesive sediment accumulations’ to distinguish between a natural changing beach and one that is fixed in space and time, primarily for amenity purposes.  

    This session will cover: 

    • Increased awareness of what constitutes a ‘beach’ in varying management contexts 

    • Understanding of the inevitability for more hard defences due to e.g. funding and uncertainty 

    • Appreciation the impact this process of conversion has on future R&D, stakeholder engagement and coastal monitoring 

  • 14:30
    Living with the legacy of an artificially created coastline in Lincolnshire, England
     
  • 15:00
    Q&A session
     
  • 14:00
    Adaptation pathways for shoreline management planning

    Climate induced coastal change can potentially threaten coastal communities by damaging infrastructure and heritage, in some cases causing a loss of homes and land. Coastal habitats and wildlife are also vulnerable. In the UK, there is a growing recognition that strategic plans, including the second generation of Shoreline Management Plans (SMPs), need to include long-term adaptive responses to evolving risks and opportunities due to climate change at vulnerable coastal sites.  

    This session will: 

    • Introduce the concept and process of developing adaptation pathways, building on the current SMP approach to coastal management 

    • Consider how adaptation pathways can improve strategic coastal management decision-making  

    • Share insights gained, through to a set of case studies, on the application of adaptation pathways to help deal with climate-related coastal challenges 

  • 14:20
    Adaptive coastal management at three sites in East Anglia

    n the UK, Coastal Partnership East (CPE), the Environment Agency and central government (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA)) are working together to drive towards a sustainable and strategic approach for communities to adapt to coastal change. This is especially important for those localities where insufficient cost benefit can be derived to provide traditional defences, funded wholly or partially by government Grant in Aid (GiA), or where traditional defences do not provide the best management approach. 

    Shoreline Management Plans (SMPs) aim to identify sustainable, long-term management policies for the coast but it is unlikely to be; economically viable, socially desirable or environmentally sustainable to defend many areas. Therefore, alternative management options, including potential adaptation measures, need to be considered.  

    This session will cover: 

    • Adaptive coastal management case studies at several sites in East Anglia, in the UK, including; the villages of Trimingham and Hemsby in Norfolk, and a rural community at Easton Bavents in Suffolk 

    • The case to include adaptation in National FCERM and central government policy to enable approaches to be equally considered and delivered 

  • 14:40
    The right time, the right place and the right people – governance of change
     
  • 15:00
    Q&A session
     
  • 14:00
    RSLR-induced changes in habitats distribution in the Ebro delta: implications for adopting an adaptation strategy

    Long-term planning and management of deltas require assessing the potential impact of relative sea level rise (RSLR) by taking into account not only the affected surface but also their socio-economic and environmental consequences. The main aim of this work is to improve flood-damage assessments due to RSLR in natural areas introducing the capacity of adaptation of coastal habitats.

    As an example, wetlands would reduce their existing surface to 41% in 2050 under RCP4.5 scenario (709 ha) following the total damage approach where any habitat inundated is lost. On the other hand, wetlands would double their current surface at the same scenario and time horizon (2,554 ha) considering the capability of habitat succession. From the management standpoint, this new perspective permits to consider RSLR not just as a threat, but also as an opportunity from the natural standpoint. Therefore, new criteria to adopt a different decision on adaptation needs can be adopted in order to be sustainable in the context of climate change. 

    This session will cover: 

    • RSLR-induced flooding does not mean necessarily a total loss of value of the territory. 

    • The resilience capacity of coastal habitats depends on their typology and hazard magnitude. 

    • Applying this methodology in the Ebro Delta, the loss in agriculture (mainly rice production) is compensated by getting benefits from ecosystem services provided by new wetlands.   

  • 14:20
    Cyclic nearshore bar development as a driver of beach erosion and accretion along the Bonny Island Coast, Nigeria
     
  • 14:40
    The giving delta: a systems approach to a consolidated and sustainable lower Mississipi river delta

    While generating prosperity for many generations, more than a century of levees-only policy for the training of the Mississippi River to limit riverine flood risk, and river management designed to safeguard navigation, has resulted in massive land loss that threatens communities along the Gulf coast including New Orleans. The region is now exposed to ever increasing threat from encroaching Gulf waters, increased storm intensity, and rising economic fragility. Flooding and storms have always been a part of life for the delta communities, but the great wealth derived from navigation, commerce, energy and fisheries has justified living with these risks.  

    On the Louisiana Gulf Coast today, the balance between risk and reward may be close to tipping point. Direct, focused action is needed to transform the relationship between society and environment, or we will continue to witness the profound dissolution of the Louisiana wetlands.  

    As the latest in a series of high-profile “Resilience” Design Competitions in North America, 126 firms from around the world were charged to challenge the conventional boundaries between engineers, scientists, ecologists, planners and policy experts to establish a framework for a bold, yet implementable, plan of action for addressing the next century on the Louisiana Delta Coast. 

    This session will cover: 

    • The Giving Delta response to the Changing Course Design Challenge, a framework developed by a partnership between US and European private sector, Academic Institutions and Centers of Excellence 

    • The “design-with nature” approach results in a paradigm shift in the radical retooling of the management of the Mississippi River and am integrated investment strategy as the primary decision drivers.  

    • Instead of completely restoring the Mississippi Delta to its natural landscape, a bold, innovative “systems approach” was established in linking the specific needs of the region’s ecosystem, economy and community.  

    • Adaptive responses to climate change, ecosystem restoration and navigation do not have be mutually exclusive with the promotion of one, being at the expense of another. 

  • 15:00
    Q&A session
     
  • 15:15
    Refreshments, networking and exhibition
     

Conference divides into streams

Stream 1
Stream 2
Stream 3
  • 15:45
    Mitigation of coastal erosion impacts: case study on by-pass dredging in the ports of Arenys and Masnou in Barcelona, Spain

    The Maresme area (Barcelona, Spain) is suffering erosion since the 40’s due mainly to anthropic actions that modified progressively the natural sedimentary balance (e.g. construction of ports).  

    Progressive erosion has led to massive accretion to the North-East of ports and to the virtual removal of sandy beaches to the South-West. This has increased the vulnerability of coastal assets, and affected tourism and ports operations among others.  

    The Spanish and Catalonian Governments have tackled in the past the issue with a combination of beach nourishment projects and “hard engineering” measures to hold the line, and more recently with a “soft engineering” coastal management approach with sand “by-pass”.  

    This session will cover:  

    An outline of three sand “by-pass” projects commissioned by both Governments, with a focus on: 

    • The description of the ongoing issues 

    • The historical background 

    • The coastal dynamics studies (that provided the grounds for the definition of volumes to be “by-passed”) 

    • The detailed design 

    • A brief description of the outcomes of the sand “by-pass” 

  • 16:05
    Comparing hard and soft engineering solutions for marina inlet sedimentation and coastal erosion at Blankenberge and Wenduine, Belgium

    Blankenberge and Wenduine are two neighbouring Belgian coastal towns that are both experiencing morphological issues. The access channel to the Blankenberge marina is constrained by two low groynes and permeable jetties and experiences sedimentation due to littoral drift. Less than three kilometres to the west, Wenduine is located at a breakpoint in coastline orientation and experiences structural beach erosion.   

    A feasibility study was performed to investigate different solutions for both issues, wherein eleven alternative solutions were simulated using numerical models of morphodynamics over 1-5 years (XBeach), hydrodynamics (XBeach) and wave penetration (MIKE 21 BW). Based on the simulations, the alternatives were compared for their effectiveness in reducing the erosion / sedimentation issues, impact on nautical access to the marina, swimmer safety, flood protection, ecology, cost, and scenic impacts.   

    Based on workshop discussions with stakeholders, the optimal solution was selected. 

    This session will cover: 

    •  Solutions for integrated coastal zone management in Flanders 

    •  Use of detailed morphological models in view of cost optimisation 

    •  Practical feedback from stakeholders’ sessions 

  • 16:25
    Investigation of dredging maintenance strategies in La Rochelle Marina
     
  • 16:45
    Q&A session
     
  • 15:45
    Posters
     
  • 16:45
    Q&A session
     
  • 15:45
    Predicting future coastal erosion in Scotland across decadal-centennial timescales: a process-driven model
     
  • 16:05
    Erosion due to sea level rise: a Glamorgan case study

    A case study to demonstrate the quantification of the effect of accelerated sea level rise on coastal cliff recession.  The study site is the Nash Shore in Glamorgan, South Wales, UK.  The Soft Cliff And Platform Erosion (SCAPE) modelling tool is used.   

    This case study partially demonstrates a technique that is being applied at national scale (Wales and England) in the project Cliff and Shore Sensitivity to Accelerated Sea Level Rise, which is funded by the Environment Agency (EA) under the UK Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management Research Strategy.  

    This session will cover: 

    • The application of SCAPE 

    • Normalisation of the results to represent the Glamorgan region  

    • The release of similar results for all regions of Wales and Wales 

  • 16:25
    Flooding-erosion interactions: implications for coastal risk management

    Low lying barrier islands exemplify coastal environments particularly affected by erosion-flooding interactions. This study undertakes a high resolution, multidecadal shoreline change analysis at Blakeney Point, a mixed sand-gravel spit on the UK's North Norfolk coast. The analysis spans two distinct management regimes: the 'first era' (1992-2005) where the eastern section of the barrier was periodically artificially reprofiled into a steep-sided trapezoid with a narrow crest; and the 'second era' (2006-2016) of no active intervention along the entire barrier. Our findings suggest a change in the morphological character of the barrier under the non-interventionist management regime, with clear implications for erosion, flooding and their interaction. 
     
    This session will cover: 

    • Flooding and erosion hazards are often analysed separately, without due attention to their interaction 

    • Termination of interventionist coastal management regimes can encourage resumption of more natural coastal processes, with positive downdrift impacts 

    • Management strategies must account for extreme changes during storm surge events and the role of these events in shaping longer-term landscape evolution 

     

  • 16:45
    Q&A session
     

Optional activities

Site visit
  • 17:15
    Site visit to La Rochelle Marina
    A walking tour around the centre of the old town and the Old Port. You will be walked through the history of the great moments of La Rochelle, a free merchant city: the memory of Eleanor of Aquitaine, the escapades of Henri IV and Cardinal Richelieu’s siege of La Rochelle. Fall in love with the majestic buildings, the bustling quays and the vibrant cafés.

    Places for this session are limited. To reverve your free place, please email [email protected]


     
  • 18:45
    Close of day one
     
  • 08:45
    Registration, refreshments and exhibition
     

Conference divides into streams

Stream 1
Stream 2
Stream 3
  • 09:15
    Developing a new Humber flood risk management strategy to support people, businesses and the environment
     
  • 09:35
    A 360 degree approach to resolving uncertainty and prioritising delivery of coastal adaptation, resilience and environmental protection for the future economic growth of Jersey, Channel Isles

    The island of Jersey has a rich history influenced by natural and man-made change; particularly the fortifications constructed as defensive structures during periods of conflict, from the Napoleonic period through to 1940’s.   

    Jersey’s shoreline policies balance the Island’s environmental legislation and economic policies, but a priority for the Government is no land loss, flood avoidance, mitigation and development opportunities through planning policy and asset adaptation in a way that supports the Island’s prosperity.  

    A 360 degree approach, appropriate to Jersey, is taken to deliver an island wide coastal resilience plan the outcome will be the Jersey Shoreline Management Plan (SMP). 

    This session will cover: 

    • The first ever emerging coastal and inland flood mapping under the jurisdiction of the Government of Jersey, supported by shoreline planning and policy  

    • Hear about how this mapping augments the plan for integrated coastal management based on the Government’s environmental, community and economic objectives 

    • A perspective where the management plan baseline is no land loss and scheme delivery economics are done to understand prioritisation rather than if it will proceed at all 

  • 09:55
    Shoreline management planning for economic development in Belize

    Belize is a world-famous tourist destination known for its mangrove and palm-fringed islands. Working in collaboration with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the Government of Belize has developed multiple phases of a ‘Sustainable Tourism Program’ (STP), to broaden and enhance the tourism economy.

    As part of the STP, the ‘Support for Improving Disaster and Climate Resilience in Sustainable Tourism’ Project was commissioned covering the Corozal District in northern Belize, where there is a strong tourism potential, and high levels of coastal risks. The project delivered a Shoreline Management Plan (the first in the Region), defined around coastal resilience outcomes, as the foundation for future sustainable economic development, together with designs for four nature-based demonstration projects, governance recommendations and training for institutional capacity building. The project framework is transferrable and provides a foundation for resilient economic growth. 

    This session will cover: 

    • A new approach to Shoreline Management Planning, with policy recommendations explicitly linked to development outcomes rather than engineering; facilitating a more integrated approach to coastal resilience

    • How nature-based approaches to coastal protection can provide enhance outcomes for the environment and community

    • Understand how this framework can be adopted in other areas as the foundation for sustainable development and stimulate economic growth

  • 10:15
    Q&A session
     
  • 09:15
    Posters
     
  • 10:15
    Q&A session
     
  • 09:15
    Autonomous monitoring of nearshore geomorphology and hydrodynamics to assist decision making in coastal management using shore-based radar systems: a case study on the Fylde peninsula

    Nearshore areas can be incredibly dynamic and therefore are difficult to monitor using traditional survey methods. These physical datasets are vital to the design and effective continued maintenance of coastal defence interventions. Shore-based remote sensing can continuously collect large volumes of monitoring data to support these works. 

    At the time of writing, 10 weeks’ worth of data has been processed and revealed the migration of sedimentary features along Rossall beach. It is anticipated that this system will be the first of many permanent stations around the UK coastline, allowing a near-real time digital twin of the nearshore zone to be created and constantly updated.   

    This session will cover: 

    • Hear about a novel solution to large-area, continuous coastal monitoring 

    • Understand how data collected is then used in the development of beach management options, to inform the Wyre Beach Management Outline Business Case, currently being developed by Jacobs UK 

    • How datasets collected in this way will form a crucial long-term evidence base for planning the most cost-effective coastal defence interventions and monitoring their effectiveness in response to variations in storminess, erosion and coastal squeeze  

  • 09:45
    The value of monitoring data to sustainable coastal management in North East England

    There is widespread acceptance of an undeniable value in the coastal monitoring data that is being collected and, more importantly, in how the improved understanding of physical processes and coastal change is informing sustainable coastal management.   

    With over ten years of data now available from this National Coastal Monitoring Framework, this paper provides specific examples from the Northeast England Regional Coastal Monitoring Programme. 

    At this session you will: 

    • Understand how the data is now routinely used to inform various aspects of sustainable coastal management, including:  
      - Long-term and strategic land use planning 
      - Capital coastal defence schemes 
      - Asset maintenance
      - Warning systems.   

    • Hear about the genesis of the Northeast England programme and how it has evolved over time to now incorporate mapping of marine sediment and seabed habitats and assessment of microplastics, as well as establishing approaches to ‘valuing’ the coastal monitoring data that is being collected 
       

  • 10:15
    Q&A session
     
  • 10:30
    Refreshments, networking and exhibition
     

Conference divides into streams

Stream 1
Stream 2
Stream 3
  • 11:00
    Engineering meets public participation on the coast in Surrey, British Columbia, Canada

    City of Surrey is a coastal community located within the Greater Vancouver area of British Columbia, Canada, with an average annual population growth rate of 2% over the last 10 years.  Since early European settlement in the 19th century, the community has managed flooding, having over 60 sq. km. of land located within coastal floodplains containing significant critical infrastructure. 

    To tackle the hard questions about sea level rise, City of Surrey embarked on an innovative public planning process that incorporates engineering analysis and builds on extensive coastal, riverine and hydrologic modelling.  By engaging residents, stakeholders and partners on long-term adaptation approaches, priority, near-term infrastructure investments were developed that were consistent with long-term needs.   

    At this session you will: 

    • Hear about a coastal flood resilience and adaptation project valued at C$187 million and how it increases resilience of critical infrastructure, while also reducing cumulative socio-economic damages and providing important community benefits.   

    • Understand the benefits of engineers collaborating with other professions to engage the public, when seeking clear and confident decision making around complex coastal engineering challenges 

  • 11:20
    Leveraging coastal management for improved resilience, environmental enhancement, and equitable access to Lake Erie in Euclid, Ohio

    In the late 2000s, Euclid, Ohio’s government established an ambitious plan to improve the city’s image and liveability though enhancement of public park spaces and its Lake Erie waterfront. The opportunity to marry these initiatives with coastal management presented itself along a one-kilometer stretch of waterfront actively eroding and threatening privately held lands.  

    Through seven years of public meetings, private negotiations, and inclusive design charrettes, the city and 98 waterfront property owners developed agreements to donate or provide permanent easements along their failing bluffs to the city to develop a linear public walkway and park in exchange for stabilization; a first within the state of Ohio, this approach has also established a new benchmark for the entire Great Lakes watershed. 

    Through state, federal, and local funding and creative negotiations, the City of Euclid and SmithGroup gained the approvals needed to create a linear recreational waterfront park and trail using both hard and soft engineering techniques designed to dynamically mitigate Lake Erie’s erosive forces while not impeding natural littoral transport.  

    At this session you will: 

    • Evaluate how numerical and physical modelling studies can be used to optimize design alternatives for shoreline stabilization 

    • Explore how this design approach achieved a stable, resilient waterfront that supports equitable recreational access for the community and its visitors 

    • Understand the role that public/private coordination and community engagement can play in implementing larger-scale solutions for coastal resilience issue 

  • 11:40
    Shore Scape: nature based engineering for urban coastal zones
    The ShoreScape project (2017-2022), a collaboration of the University of Twente and Delft University of Technology, focuses on coastal urban configurations that integrate pro-active sediment management using the ‘Building-with-Nature’ (BwN) technique. The sandy, dune-aligned west coast of the Netherlands is currently employed as a ‘Living Lab’ to study the interaction of Aeolian sediment flows and building-configurations in the beach-dune environment. This is done through research by design, field experiments and computer modelling.  

    At this session you will: 
    • How the interactions between the land-shaping processes induced by the nourishments and other coastal functions can be improved as stepping-stones to new design principles for integral coastal planning enhancing BWN processes
    • Hear about two Dutch case studies, Walcheren and the Sand Motor, and how they illustrate these processes and benefits
  • 12:00
    Building sustainable climate change resilience in Kiribati

     Kiribati is one of the world’s most economically and physically vulnerable countries, consisting of 33 low lying coral atolls across 3.5 million km2 of the Pacific ocean. Of its population of 110,000, approximately half live on the crowded capital island of South Tarawa which is increasingly impacted by sea level rise and the increasing frequency of storm surge inundation.  

    The Temaiku Land and Urban Development project has developed a sustainable solution to assist Kiribati in strengthening resilience against the effects of climate change.  300 hectares of low-lying land will be reclaimed and raised by approximately 2 to 5 metres to provide a resilient basis for future land and urban development.  The Project is of national importance and has the potential to house over 35,000 people and provide a resilient governance hub. 

    This session will cover:  

    • How planning for climate change resilience has the potential to drive broader sustainable and resilient outcomes 

    •  The Temaiku Land and Urban Development project, which has developed a sustainable solution to assist Kiribati in strengthening resilience against the effects of climate change 

    • How an integrated planning, engineering and environmental approach was implemented throughout the development of the project to enable the design to identify and address key social and environmental risks and opportunities 

  • 12:20
    Q&A session
     
  • 11:00
    Integrated and sustainable solutions for adapting to coastal change at Northey Island, Essex, UK

    Northey Island is located within the highly designated Blackwater Estuary, Essex (UK) and presents an opportunity to implement integrated and sustainable solutions for adapting to coastal change over the next 100 years. 

    The coastal adaptation strategy being implemented at Northey Island follows on from England’s first Managed Realignment scheme that was implemented on the Island in 1991.  The existing sea defences (clay embankments) are all presently in poor condition and in 2013 their management responsibility was formally passed over to the National Trust (as landowner) by the Environment Agency.  The saltmarshes around the island are showing the impacts of sea level rise and climate change and the Trust aims to make management decisions to support the conservation of this priority habitat.   

    At this session you will: 

    • Hear about an innovative strategy comprising of a suite of management approaches which has been developed –the NT Coastal Adaptation Strategy and Shifting Shores principles 

    • Understand how the strategy provides long-term, holistic solutions to the pressures of climate change and sea level rise, seeking to both safeguard the important intertidal habitat and allowing the estuary space to adapt over the coming century 

    • Hear how the project also builds understanding and confidence as a catalyst to coastal adaptation across the UK and elsewhere 

  • 11:20
    The impact that geomorphological development of managed realignment sites has on fish habitat

    When coastal sites are breached and introduced to intertidal processes for flood defence and habitat creation purposes, the design primarily focuses on energy dissipation, the flora and the ‘air breathing fauna which are fluffy, feathered or rare’. Little attention is paid to the underwater habitat created which, for fish, can provide rich feeding grounds and refuge from larger predators, as well as acting as a nursery.  

    This positive impact on the aquatic eco-system can, in turn, add to the local economy through improved commercial fishing and increased tourism, leading to improvements in human health and wellbeing.  

    This session will cover: 

    • How coastal managers can improve the health of the seas through design 

    • Understand how MR design is impacting on fish colonisation in a changing habitat, providing lessons for future MR designs 

    • Understand the positive impact that coastal management can have on fish populations and how a successfully designed intertidal fish habitat is important for coastal food webs 

  • 11:40
    Progress on eco-engineering – a comparative international perspective
     
  • 12:00
    Coastal landfills, rising sea levels and shoreline management: a challenge for the 21st century

    There is growing concern that historic landfill sites located near the coast could pose a significant risk to the environment as a result of coastal flooding and the release of solid waste by erosion. In England and Wales, the majority of landfill sites have been assigned a ‘Hold The Line’ Policy in Shoreline Management. However, there is no clear funding mechanism to deliver this policy. Equally, we lack protocols that allow the impact of different categories of waste release to the sea to be assessed in a consistent and evidence-based manner.  

    This session will cover: 

    • The scale of challenge that coastal waste landfills represent on the south coast, nationally and globally 

    • Three vignettes illustrating the different ways that these challenges are manifest based on detailed case studies  

    •  Some of the challenges faced when considering solutions and discuss the potential for change to the current thinking, including how FCERM projects are funded and delivered  

  • 12:20
    Q&A session
     
  • 11:00
    Broader outcomes and place shaping – delivering more through effective partnerships
     
  • 11:45
    Facilitated discussion: governance, funding and delivery through partnerships
     
  • 12:30
    Lunch, networking and exhibition
     

Conference divides into streams

Stream 1
Stream 2
Stream 3
  • 13:30
    Decision making in Dutch coastal research based on coastal management policy assumptions

    Rijkswaterstaat is tasked with the operations and maintenance of the Dutch coastline in relation to Coastal Flood and Erosion Risk Management (CFERM). As a component of this task Rijkswaterstaat strategically nourishes the coastline with sediments to sustainably preserve coastal functions such as protection of the low-lying hinterland against flooding, infrastructure on the dunes and dune habitats. To continually refine and update the coastal management policy and practice, Rijkswaterstaat leads multiple research programs. These nourishments combined with the associated research provides an adaptive strategy to gradually adapt our coast to sea level rise.  

    At this session you will:

    • Understand how Rijkswaterstaat uses the strategical, tactical and operational CFERM goals and the associated CFERM policy assumptions to guide the research programs. 

    • Hear about several case studies on the planning and implementation of government initiated coastal research in the Netherlands 

    • Learn how this research feeds back into CFERM policy and practice 

  • 13:50
    Cost-effectiveness analysis for coastal protection of the north coast of Zealand, Denmark

    This presentation will showcase a case study on large-scale beach nourishment along the 60km north coast of Zealand, Denmark.  

    This session will cover: 

    • Large scale regionally coordinated beach nourishment scheme

    • Assessment of existing coastal protection structures and required upgrading on a 50 year time scale

    • Cost-effectiveness analysis for coastal protection schemes combining beach nourishment and revetments

  • 14:10
    The UK’s first sand-scaping project in Bacton, Norfolk: from idea to reality

    The Bacton Sandscaping scheme is a large-scale beach nourishment, designed to protect the Bacton Gas Terminal from cliff and beach erosion while also reducing flood and erosion risk to the communities of Bacton and Walcott, buying the time they need for adaptation to coastal change. The scheme was inspired by the Dutch Zandmotor project but has translated the concept to the different geography and governance setting of the UK – it has been described as the Zandmotor’s ‘little nephew’. 

     At this session you will:

    • Learn about the sandscaping approach, how it has developed from concept to reality and how it will work in practice  

    • Hear about a truly unique collaboration between multiple private and public sector organisations 

  • 14:30
    Q&A session
     
  • 13:30
    Local economic change and regeneration in Felixstowe following the 2012 coastal resilience project – a case study
     
  • 13:50
    The wider benefits of coastal defences as a driver for positive change in areas of deprivation

    he £63million Rossall Coastal Defence Scheme was opened on the 1st June 2018.  It was developed through the Fylde Peninsular Coastal programme consisting of Blackpool, Wyre and Fylde Councils, working together in partnership with principal contractor Balfour Beatty and main funding body the Environment Agency.  The scheme built upon a wealth of learning from previous schemes along the Fylde coast in particular the Cleveleys and Blackpool central schemes.  The physical elements of the scheme involved renewing 2kms off failing sea-walls and promenade whilst preserving the beach frontage to better protect over 7,500 properties from coastal flooding from the Irish Sea.  However, the true value of the works is far greater than property protection alone.  

    At this session you will: 

    • Learn from a case study on the added value to communities, the environment and the local economy from coastal defence investment by linking engineering to social wellbeing, economic and environmental improvement 

    • Explore a development of learning over the last two decades in both engineering construction techniques and the broadening of the scope and vision of what coast defence schemes can achieve for society 

    • Hear about the interaction between the users and beneficiaries of the new works in jointly developing a vision for the area in which the coastal defence scheme provided a catalyst for wider neighbourhood improvements through the development of high-quality public space 

  • 14:30
    Penzance from now: strategic planning within a policy for change
     
  • 14:30
    Q&A session
     
  • 13:30
    Creating more – a partnership approach to adapting to our changing coast

    he Benacre and Kessingland Flood Management Project is a catchment-scale, partnership approach to managing the flood risk in the Lothingland and Kessingland Valley, Suffolk, UK.  This large river valley sits within an Internal Drainage Board district, who are project managing the scheme on behalf of a wider partnership of risk management authorities and local stakeholders. The valley has no formal flood defences and is solely reliant on eroding soft dunes for protection.  The frontage had been afforded natural protection from a large sand and shingle ridge, Benacre Ness, which is slowly moving northwards and has left the coast exposed.   

    The 2012 Suffolk Shoreline Management plan recommended managing the coast in situ in the short term and developing adaptive options for delivery after 2025.  Erosion of the Benacre frontage has, however, been more rapid than predicted and now needs to be addressed as soon as possible with a viable sustainable capital solution to protect 44 homes, over 600ha of farmland, major tourism businesses including Africa Alive Safari Park and the main A12 road.  

    At this session you will:

    • Hear about a complex managed realignment project which has addressed coastal, fluvial and pluvial flood risk issue, alongside challenging coastal erosion issues

    • Hear about the unique, collaborative approach among 13 organisations and businesses, who are working together in adapting to these issues to make the project a success

  • 13:50
    Comparing coastal management and climate change adaptation approaches in distinct locations: case studies from Louisiana (USA), England (UK), Vancouver (Canada) and Diego Garcia (BOIT)
     
  • 14:10
    Parcel buyout and greenspace acquisition as adaptation policy in response to storm risk and recurrent flooding in a coastal port city

    Coastal urban areas are experiencing the effects of sea level rise in the form of more frequent and intense flooding. Retreat from vulnerable at-risk areas and the creation of open green space that may be used for both storm water retention and enhanced recreational activities is a common mitigation strategy. This research presents a methodology for the identification and acquisition of privately owned urban parcels in an effort to reduce risk to property and wellbeing, create green space, and manage water. 

    This session will cover: 

    • A science-based, general framework that may be used to guide local parcel acquisition policy in response to increasing risk posed by sea level rise and flooding. 

    • Modelling of storm scenarios to identity areas most at risk and potential targets for government purchase of private parcels.  

    • Measurement of cost for government to purchase private parcels and the Return on Investment (ROI) in terms of displaced populations, mortality, acute injuries, chronic conditions, and mental illness. 

  • 14:30
    Q&A session
     
  • 14:45
    Refreshments, networking and exhibition
     
  • 15:15
    Plenary session
     
  • 16:00
    Q&A session
     
  • 16:15
    Introduction to the technical site visit on day three
     
  • 17:00
    Refreshments, networking and exhibition
     
  • 17:30
    Close of day two
     
  • 18:30
    Gala Dinner at La Rochelle Aquarium
     
  • Technical site visit to La Faute Sur Mer

    New for the 2019 edition of the conference is the technical visit on 26 September is included as part of the conference experience, offering delegates the opportunity to learn about France’s most recent major coastal flooding event, Storm Xynthia, and its impact in areas surrounding La Rochelle. The storm claimed a number of lives and caused hundreds of millions of Euros damage.

    Poor maintenance of some of the area’s coastal defence infrastructure was blamed in part for these effects, but in addition to renewed structural investment, the event also called for improved emergency response procedures and immediate adaptation of coastal communities to coastal risk. This caused controversy with local authorities and communities, and has stimulated a lot of new thinking and new approaches to coastal management in France across a variety of professions.

    The site visit will include locations that were hardest hit by Storm Xynthia as well as places where a variety of different schemes have been constructed in response.

    Included:

    • Visit the La Faute Memorial
    • Walk around the Bay of Aiguillon natural area
    • Expert explanation of critical features at key sites
    • Lunch
    • Transport
    • Drop off at La Rochelle Airport (13:30) and Train Station (14:00)
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