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Lecture

How can we learn from the past to engineer a nature and people positive future?

Event organised by ICE

Date
18 April 2024
Time
18:00 - 20:30 AET (GMT+10)
Location
Beca Sydney offices
Level 11/44 Market Street
New South Wales,
Australia

This event has now ended

Overview

Join this CPD lecture on the critical topic of nature and people positive design.

Australia’s biodiversity is in crisis. Over the last 200 years, Australia has suffered the largest documented decline in biodiversity of any country. Despite efforts to manage threats and pressures to biodiversity in Australia, it is still in decline and infrastructure professionals have a key role in its future.

This event will feature expert speakers from the wider region who will cover a range of topics related to regenerative design, including environmental history. As the natural and built environments blur, this event will deepen knowledge and give practical insights that will help people build safer and more sustainable landscapes for the future.

This event will be jointly hosted by the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) and the Australian Aotearoa NZ Environmental History Network.

Programme

18:00 - 18:15

Doors open

18:15 - 19:30

Event start

19:30 - 20:30

Networking begins

20:30

Event ends

Speakers

Colin Finn

Colin Finn

Blue Green

co-founder

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Colin Finn

Colin is a passionate environmental advocate with a background in leading high growth entrepreneurial ventures. He is undertaking a PhD at the University of Sydney, focusing on the coming crisis of climate change and the impacts it will have on our urban areas.

His research focuses on the barriers to the implementation of Blue Green Infrastructure especially those within the urban planning, financial and governance spheres.

Colin is a co-founder of Blue Green - a social enterprise seeking to transform Sydney Harbour through the use of innovative community engagement, gamification and AI.

Kala Senathirajah

Kala Senathirajah

College of Environmental Engineering Board (CEE)

chair

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Kala Senathirajah

Kala Senathirajah is an experienced water industry engineer. Her endeavours encompass academia, research, and industry. Kala currently works at the Bureau of Meteorology and is also pursuing her PhD that focuses on microplastics in the water cycle, at the University of Newcastle.

She advocates for environmental protection and serves on committees for organizations promoting water equity, sustainability and an interest to build resilience. Kala is the incoming chair of the College of Environmental Engineering Board. 

Kala's contributions have been recognised through publications, presentations, and awards.

Sibyl Bloomfield

Sibyl Bloomfield

School of Future Environments, Auckland University of Technology

senior lecturer

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Sibyl Bloomfield

Sibyl Bloomfield is a senior lecturer in AUT’s School of Future Environments. Her teaching and research practice is grounded in a commitment to shaping our place in the world by engaging in the Māori World, the great Pacific Ocean, and actively responding to the ecological, socio-cultural and climate crises of the Anthropocene. With a particular interest in the significant role the coast plays in our Pacific cultures and identities and the impact of the over-development of these fragile transitional zones in our urban centres in our changing climate reality.

Taylor Coyne

Taylor Coyne

Australian Aotearoa NZ Environmental History Network & University of New South Wales

phd candidate

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Taylor Coyne

Taylor is a Human Geography PhD candidate, with a focus on urban political ecology, hydro-social history and critical design theory. He is based in the Environment and Society Group at the University of New South Wales, Sydney.

Taylor works in the space of creating meaningful, community-centric, culturally inclusive water sensitive urban design. He is currently involved in a number of collaborative projects in Sydney, Melbourne and Europe, and researches within unceded Gadigal, Bidjigal, Gweagal and Wangal Country in Sydney, Australia.

Taylor's PhD research focuses in on the history and politics of Sydney’s urban stormwater infrastructure. In particular, asking how and why did Sydney’s waterscapes come to be the way they are today. Further, he questions what are the major challenges and opportunities for how these spaces have been designed, managed, and governed.

Salote Nasalo

Salote Nasalo

University of the South Pacific

research assistant

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Salote Nasalo

Salote Nasalo is an environmental activist and research assistant at the Pacific Centre for Environment & Sustainable Development at the University of the South Pacific (PaCE-SD). Her research focuses on the role of climate action in mangrove management and restoration.

Previously, she was a ACIAR PASS-CR Scholar, completing a Master of Science in Climate Change at the University of the South Pacific, Fiji. her Masters project assessed the management of natural, mixed and managed mangrove systems in Fiji, including case studies of the Nasese Seawall and Lami Beach.

Salote Nasalo is actively involved in a number of committees, including Member of the Pacific Establishment Committee and PaCE-SD Student Association.

Eleanor Earl

Eleanor Earl

University of New South Wales

phd candidate

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Eleanor Earl

A chartered civil engineer with experience working in countries across the Caribbean, Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and most recently the Pacific Islands, Eleanor is currently undertaking a PhD at the University of New South Wales' Water Research Centre. She has been an active member of the Institution of Civil Engineers for more than a decade in South Wales, London, Hong Kong, and, lately, New South Wales.

Previously, Eleanor worked at Arup for 7 years, working on a variety infrastructure projects including London redevelopment projects, sustainable urban drainage projects in Hong Kong, city resilience in Ghana, developing guidance for surface water management in humanitarian response, leading the water resilience portfolio at the Resilience Shift, and working with youth to adapt to climate change in Bangladesh.

For more information please contact:

Ben Guinea

Sustainable Development Goals: