The Chris Binnie Award for Sustainable Water Management 2017

A system that uses rainfall and water level sensors to make the most beneficial use of storm water infrastructure is this year’s winner of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) Chris Binnie award.

Developed by US storm water management company Opti, the Continuous Monitoring and Adaptive Control of Distributed Storm Water Infrastructure, (CMAC) system combines several hardware and software innovations to control the flow of storm water.

Named after the veteran water engineer, the Chris Binnie Award for Sustainable Water Management is presented annually at the ICE Awards and recognises innovations that have benefitted society by improving the sustainability of water. The award was borne of the eponymous sponsor's personal and professional experience of working in the water industry.

Over 200 guests join winners for the presentation of awards by ICE President Professor Tim Broyd, at an awards lunch at One Great George Street on 6 October 2017.

Nomination is open to any organisation or individual that has promoted sustainable management of water. The topic can be anything which promotes sustainable management of water, such as water resources, flood control, water treatment, or addresses environmental issues. The phase can be strategy, research, project implementation, or operation. The organisation can be government, research organisations, water companies, or project developers.

Award winners Opti receive a certificate and an engraved water jug for CMAC. They were nominated by UK firm Aquality Trading & Consulting Ltd of London, one of the UK's longest established and leading suppliers of rainwater harvesting and greywater recycling systems.

The runner up is UK Flood Barriers for their self-actuating flood barriers. They are a UK firm and have examples in UK, Cockermouth (which has the world's longest length of passive flood barrier), and in New York (part of the revitalised New York University Hospital in downtown Manhattan). Previous winners include Southern Water for their water metering programme, CIRIA for their SuDs manual, Hong Kong Water Supply Department for their dual water supply system, Essex Water for their Langford water reuse system, Guy Thomas for his estate hydro power project, and the Environment Agency for their Water Demand Management Centre. Judging is by a subcommittee of the ICE Water Expert Panel. The criteria are benefit, innovation, value for money and applicability elsewhere.

Professor Tim Broyd, ICE President said: "The ICE Awards are highly valued. The winner of this year's Chris Binnie award shows the importance of sustainable water management in an environmentally diverse and changing landscape."

Chris Binnie said "Being a fourth-generation water engineer brought home to me the importance of the sustainable management of water. This led me to set up the annual Award for Sustainable Water Management, an engraved water jug, presented each year by the President of the Institution of Civil Engineers."

Notes to editors

The Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) is a leading source of professional expertise in transport, water supply and treatment, flood management, waste and energy. Established in 1818, it has 91,000 members, 25% of whom are based overseas. ICE’s vision is to place civil engineering at the heart of society, delivering sustainable development through knowledge, skills and professional expertise. ICE has long worked with the government of the day to help it to achieve its objectives, and has worked with industry to ensure that construction and civil engineering remain major contributors to the UK economy.

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