World Bank, Oxford University and Engineers Without Borders to close GEC week

The last day of Global Engineering Congress will focus on driving change, investment, education and governance in the sector.

The Global Engineering Congress will look at how the UN Sustainable Development Goals can be met. Image credit: United Nations
The Global Engineering Congress will look at how the UN Sustainable Development Goals can be met. Image credit: United Nations
How to finance sustainable infrastructure will be the topic of the World Bank’s keynote address on the fifth day of the GEC in London (26 October 2018). 

Jordan Schwartz, Director for Infrastructure, Public Private Partner and Guarantees at World Bank, will talk about how to effectively manage the risks and costs of infrastructure, as well as how risks are reduced in projects in developing nations.
 

Funding infrastructure projects will continue to be a theme throughout the day, as the GEC will give delegates a chance to discuss ICE’s latest State of the Nation (SoN) 2018 report, just a week after its publication.

 
Using case studies and examples of international best practice, the SoN report looks at how the flow of funding and finance can be optimised to support the needs of the infrastructure sector. 

The discussion will be led by KPMG’s Head of Brexit, James Stewart, and involve Paul Sheffield, former CEO of construction firm Kier, and Andrew Rose, CEO of the Global Infrastructure Investor Association. 

Alex Money, who directs the Innovative Infrastructure Investment programme at the University of Oxford, will help provide more specific insight into infrastructure investment, with a focus on water projects.

In two sessions, he’ll discuss the piloting of new approaches to water infrastructure finance and the role of “blended” financing for engineering projects, respectively.


Engineering for good

The day will not focus solely on investment strategies, however. At its heart, engineering is about people - people carry out projects and deliver infrastructure for use by people. 

It’s therefore important that there’s a workshop led by global representatives from Engineers Without Borders (EWB) on the last day of GEC.

The workshop will allow delegates to discuss how we can inspire people to join the engineering profession, how future engineers are educated, and how practising engineers can use their skills to do good in the world. 

Click through for GEC highlights on Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, and Day 4. 
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