Innovative bridge paper authors win ICE medal

The paper details the inventive engineering behind Britain's first asymmetrical rail bridge.

Ordsall Chord in Manchester.
Ordsall Chord in Manchester.

ICE North West members, Brian Duguid, Jason Hyde and Howard Pullan, have won the ICE John Henry Garrood King medal for their paper ‘Innovative digital design delivery for the Ordsall Chord’.

Construction of the Ordsall Chord in Manchester has, for the first time, linked all of the city’s central railways stations – Manchester Piccadilly, Oxford Road and Manchester Victoria.

It was a complex project involving the creation of 350m of new track over Britain's first network arch rail bridge.

Making use of BIM

Early involvement of key parties on the project, including the main contractor and steel fabricator, allowed conventional roles and processes to be challenged.

The use of BIM was integral to the design and, in some cases, meant that drawings were dispensed with entirely, allowing key structures to be built directly from the digital model.

Award winner Brian Duguid, chartered engineer and ICE Fellow, said: “It is vitally important that civil engineers continue to share learnings and best practice which was why we produced this paper detailing our innovative use of digital design on an iconic piece of engineering in Manchester. The fact that it has been recognised is a real honour and we hope that this will bring it to the attention of even more people in the industry.

“It is important that we harness the power of digital technology to enhance how we can shape the world around us and continue working hard to develop new, innovative techniques."

Emma Antrobus, director ICE North West, said: “Engineers like Brian, Jason and Howard make things happen. They are the quiet innovators who help us all live a more seamless life.

"In this case, people can now cross the city via the rail network, meaning they have more choice and shorter journey times. Their win is well-deserved.”

The award-winning paper has been made free for all to read in perpetuity on the ICE Virtual Library.

Interested in learning more?

Sign up for the Lunch and Learn lecture on 31 Oct 2019.

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