Donald Miller joins Scottish Engineering Hall of Fame

Sir Donald Miller is one of four notable Scottish Engineers to be inducted into the Scottish Hall of Fame.

Sir Donal Miller enters the Scottish Hall of Fame for Engineers. Image from Scottish Hall of Fame.
Sir Donal Miller enters the Scottish Hall of Fame for Engineers. Image from Scottish Hall of Fame.
Sir Donald Miller
Sir Donald Miller

Sir Donald Miller, the man responsible for creating a highly respected efficient and reliable electricity supply system in Scotland is one of four notable Scottish Engineers to be inducted into the Hall of Fame which celebrates Scottish engineering accomplishments from the 16th Century to the present day.

Other new inductees include: John Logie Baird, the inventor of mechanical television and pioneer of televised images, Henry Dyer, the father of engineering education in Japan and Sir George Bruce, the pioneering genius who created a sophisticated 16th century mining complex in Culross, Fife that predated the Industrial Revolution.

Gordon Masterton, Chairman of Judges for the Hall of Fame, said: "Scotland can rightly claim to be one of the most important seed beds of great engineering accomplishments over that entire period. It has also been a great exporter of skills and expertise, as exemplified by Henry Dyer, the father of engineering education in Japan, an early example of the Scottish engineering diaspora."

Collectively, the twenty-three members in the Hall of Fame now tell a story of 450 years of world-beating engineering innovation that has led to massive improvements in our quality of life and benefits to the economy of Scotland and the United Kingdom."

The induction of Sir Donald is a fitting tribute to the huge contribution he made when Chief Engineer of the Hydro Board, the South of Scotland Electricity Board, later the first Chairman of Scottish Power plc. The strategic decisions he made between 1966 and 1992 helped develop the reliable electricity supply we enjoy today.

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