“How can we keep the lights on?” asks ICE London in third lecture of the London 2050: Engineering the Future series

Representatives from the Greater London Authority, Thames Water and Arup/Royal Academy of Engineering spoke about how London can prepare for increasing energy demand.

(L to R) Simon Wyke, GLA, Rod MacDonald, ICE London & South East Energy Panel,  Nick Mills, Thames Water and John Miles, Arup/Royal Academy of Engineering.
(L to R) Simon Wyke, GLA, Rod MacDonald, ICE London & South East Energy Panel, Nick Mills, Thames Water and John Miles, Arup/Royal Academy of Engineering.

On Tuesday 12th October, ICE London held the third lecture of its London 2050: Engineering the Future series, entitled "Energy, keeping the lights on".

The lecture looked at how the future expansion of London will affect the electricity distribution network, which is already at capacity in some areas. Held in association with Ernst & Young, the lecture examined the steps the Greater London Authority is taking to address a potential crisis, energy generation and how the lack of available infrastructure can impact competitiveness and the reputation of the capital.

Simon Wyke, Principal Policy and Programme Officer for Energy and Waste at the GLA, spoke first about the future challenges London faced and how the GLA are mapping these requirements with the 2050 London Energy Plan.

John Miles, Professor of Transitional Energy Strategies at the Royal Academy of Engineering Research, spoke about low carbon technologies and how these technologies can fit into business models.

The last speaker, Nick Mills, Wastewater Innovation Manager at Thames Water, discussed the energy potential of sewage sludge as an alternative form of energy production.

Rod MacDonald, Chairman of Civic Patterns and the ICE London and South East Energy Panel, chaired the event.

The London 2050: Engineering the Future series looks at the London Infrastructure Plan 2050, the Mayor's strategy for infrastructure over the next 35 years, during which time the population of London is forecast to increase by thirty seven per cent to more than 11 million people.

The fourth and final lecture in the series, entitled "Waste, Sustainable Solutions", will be in association with Cory Environmental and will examine the future of waste management in the London. The event will be at 6.30pm on 16th November at the Thomas Telford Theatre, One Great George Street. More information will be available shortly via www.ice.org.uk/london

ICE London would like to thank the three speakers and chair for presenting their views and to Ernst and Young for sponsoring the lecture.

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