ICE welcomes Spending Review commitment to capital investment in infrastructure

The Spending Review gives a five-year overview of the government's spending plans, looking at the budgets of all government departments.

The Spending Review gives a five-year overview of the government
The Spending Review gives a five-year overview of the government's spending plans.

Submissions were invited ahead of the Review from stakeholders across the country. ICE submitted its recommendations in September.

Chancellor George Osborne set out clearly how departmental resources will be driven by the goal of spreading economic power and wealth through a "devolution revolution" and "investment in infrastructure" as he delivered his joint Spending Review and Autumn Statement. A move that ICE Director General Nick Baveystock says provides a strong platform for the next five years.

ICE's recommendation to 'avoid cuts to capital programmes in strategic transport and flooding' appeared to have been heard, as today's Spending Review contained no significant capital spending cuts that affect UK infrastructure.

The Chancellor also announced an additional £12bn for capital investments in infrastructure, a figure which ICE will be analysing closely over the coming weeks.

In response to the Spending Review, Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) Director General, Nick Baveystock, said:

"The Chancellor's commitment to capital investment for new infrastructure projects - combined with the drive to increase devolution, innovation and apprenticeships - provides a strong platform for the next five years. The recently established Infrastructure Commission will also ensure that plans for new infrastructure are based on unbiased analysis of our needs.

"We hope to see the same level of commitment from Government in maintaining our existing infrastructure – we await more detail on how the cuts to operational budgets will affect funding for the upkeep of flood defences and local roads. We must maintain a balance between capital and maintenance budgets if we are to deliver infrastructure that gives the right level of service and connectivity, operates effectively for as long as possible, and helps to support a prosperous economy."

As always, the devil will be in the detail. We will be looking into the impacts of the operational budget cuts across many key departments. We will also publish a blog article over the next few days, providing more detailed analysis on what the announcements mean for UK infrastructure.

Read the full announcements, a copy of the speech and accompanying documents.

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