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Georgia Thompson

Georgia Thompson

assistant design programme manager at Bam Nuttall / Eiffage Kier Ferrovial BAM

Expertise

Construction, Project Management, Rail

Location

United Kingdom
Career highlights

Making the 2022 WES Top 50 Women in Engineering list

Meeting Her Royal Highness Princess Anne, patron of WISE, in 2021

Seeing my first bridge reconstruction on Christmas Day and Boxing Day in 2019

A day in my life

No day is the same!

I sit between the design and construction teams. My role involves interacting with many different people, solving problems and driving efficiencies.

I normally have two or three meetings a day to establish how our team is performing according to the programme.

In areas that could use further development, I create and implement strategies to improve the process. I also support our teams delivering engineering designs and our construction teams on site.

It involves speaking to a lot of different people and establishing what solutions will make the biggest difference. Then, we support our teams to deliver great infrastructure.

I’m also a passionate inclusion advocate. You can find me getting involved in some sort of initiative to make people feel more included at work and when joining the industry.

Still, I always find any opportunity to get suited up in orange and go out to see some stuff get built!

To feel welcomed and accepted for who you are is so important to our wellbeing.

I would recommend a career in civil engineering because…

It’s so varied.

There are so many different types of roles in civil engineering. There will always be something to suit your personal skillset and interests.

Complete this phrase: I’m a civil engineer, but I’m also…

A hiker, a muay thai(er), climber, reader, dancer and pink lover.

What about being a civil engineer gets you out of bed each morning?

I love knowing that there will be something delivered by my work, and that I contribute to making society a better place.

What’s one great thing that you love about civil engineering that you didn’t know until you started working in the industry?

Engineering isn’t just buildings and bridges.

I started out my career in utilities, which I didn’t realise supports almost everything I do.

From turning the lights out at night to brushing my teeth and checking my wi-fi connection is working.

Which civil engineering project (past or present) do you wish you’d worked on?

Silvertown Tunnel! When I was at university, I read the feasibility study as I was designing a bridge from Portsmouth to the Isle of Wight.

It’s amazing to see something come to life.

Name one civil engineering myth you’d like to bust.

Engineering is hard.

Isn’t everything in this world that’s worth having a little difficult?

You also don’t need to be super smart, just smart enough to apply yourself in the right ways.

Has civil engineering helped you overcome any personal hurdles/difficulties?

I’ve found a community of people who love trains as much as I do! I always thought I was weird, and so did my friends. But who knew - they’re the weird ones!

How can you not love trains?

Any personal causes?

Inclusion is something I stumbled on as I entered the industry.

Going into schools, universities, conferences and events is a big part of what I do.

There aren’t a lot of women, particularly of Black and Asian descent in the industry. This showed me how important inclusion is.

To feel welcomed and accepted for who you are is so important to our wellbeing.

Over the years I've taken up book clubs and led webinar series on the importance of employee resource groups, how racism can show up at work, and how to contribute to improving workplace culture.

I co-founded an organisation called Dversty that focused on the inclusion of people from diverse groups.

We were able to set up a mentoring programme between Rolls Royce and the University of West England.

That was a big highlight for me, as I got to see how the students and mentors developed over the nine month programme.

I’m currently managing a project with Engineers Without Borders called the Advocacy Programme. It’s designed to support engineers in putting globally responsibility at the heart of what we do.

They have four pillars: regenerative, responsible, inclusive, and purposeful. I’m lucky enough to be supporting the inclusivity pillar as well as the programme as a whole!

Georgia speaking on a data and diversity panel

Georgia's inclusion work

Going into schools, universities, conferences and events is a big part of what I do.  

Georgia giving a presentation with the Dversty organisation

Dversity organisation

I co-founded an organisation called Dversty that focused on the inclusion of people from diverse groups.  

Georgia on site

Seeing stuff get built!

I always find any opportunity to get suited up in orange (or yellow!) and go out to see some stuff get built!  

Georgia's career path

For my A-levels, I studied, maths, physics and history (history has always had a place in my heart). I then went to the University of Portsmouth to study my BEng and MSc.